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sports car – adobe illustrator tutorials | photoshop online



sports car – adobe illustrator tutorials | photoshop online Check out my sports car vector work with speed art time lapse video! For commission work: …

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Who Said Athletics Courts Have To Be Boring and Bland? Nike Updates the Playing Field For Young Women In Sports – PRINT Magazine

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Girls Got Game is a non-profit group that works towards empowering women through sports. The group was founded in Manila, Philippines, and helps to equip pre-teen girls with the tools they need to help them within their lives through athletics. They also receive support through mental and emotional training with female role models. 

The non-profit group recently partnered with Nike to rethink conventional sporting courts by turning them into inspirational and colorful spaces. The courts were designed by Filipina illustrator Jill Arteche and feature a diverse collection of girls interacting through various athletics. 

Arteche designed an indoor and outdoor court at Sacred Heart Academy School in Santa Maria, Bulacan. The outdoor court showcases girls playing various sports, including ruby and basketball, and the indoor court showcases girls working in their careers in science and the arts. The outdoor court has been rightfully dubbed “Now,” whereas the indoor court is called “Future.” 

Now, not only will young girls be inspired through the art of whatever game they choose, but they’ll find motivation in the space they are learning, exercising, and interacting in. Plus, playing a sport on an inspirational court will undoubtedly prove to these girls that you can bring a positive and bright attitude with you anywhere, even within athletics.



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The Resurgence of Retro Sports Design; A Conversation with Charles Nix – PRINT Magazine

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The New York Yankees and the Chicago White Sox played against each other this past August, which by itself isn’t much to write home about.  

But this wasn’t just any baseball game. Instead, it was the MLB’s first-ever “Field of Dreams” game. Played in Dyersville, Iowa, it took place on an infamous baseball diamond built in a cornfield for the beloved 1989 flick, Field of Dreams.  

The much-hyped game serves as a hallmark of a growing trend in professional sports toward nostalgia and nods to a franchise’s past. One of the ways this retro resurgence has manifested is within the sports design industry, with throwback jerseys and allusions to vintage sports branding on the rise across professional leagues. In the past year, the San Diego Padres returned to their brown and gold pinstripe roots while the Green Bay Packers unleashed a “new” vintage-inspired look that harkens back to their 50s uniforms. The NBA also recently unveiled designs for “Classic Edition” uniforms to mark their 75th anniversary in the 2021-22 season, which the league’s three original franchises—the Celtics, Knicks, and Warriors—will wear.

To help us better understand the resurgence of retro aesthetics in the sports world, I chatted with the ever-insightful Charles Nix. Nix serves as the Creative Type Director at Monotype, where he has been part of design teams that have created fonts for sports juggernauts like the English Premier League and MotoGP.

(This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.)

First off, can you share a bit about your relationship to sports and your interest in the sports design industry? 

I grew up in the midwest in the 70s, and it was a time when everyone played little league, football, and basketball. Like most people steeped in sports, I spent a lot of time in the street in front of my house playing catch with my dad. When I think of the pull of sports for me, it’s a religion of sorts—that might be heretical to say—but in the US, especially, baseball is very much like an organized religion. It has that devoted following and a long tradition. 

That’s part of what fascinates me about sports. Beyond that, there is the spectacle of live sports. From the moment you arrive at the stadium or the arena, there is this grandeur to it that far outweighs its utility. In the same way that there’s no utility in a marching band either, they can grip at your heart when you witness that orchestration of that many people. I feel that same draw when I go to sporting events and when I watch sports. It’s a combination of it having been a part of my childhood, but also the play of it that’s grand.

I recently spoke to the designer of the new crest for the NWSL team coming to LA in 2022, Angel City FC, and what was so interesting to me is how the actual team doesn’t even exist yet, but they already have a dedicated fanbase and sense of community, a crest, and a team in all of these other senses. Sports design is about so much more than the game itself. You’re designing the community, the look, and the feel of the franchise. The game almost feels beside the point, with the team becoming more of a brand outside of the sport itself. 

That’s interesting to me too. To put it in a branding perspective, there are so many touchpoints and so many places in which you can convey the team’s ethos. But mainly, what makes one team different from another is spelled out in all those touchpoints, from knit scarves to digital apps. It’s pretty crazy. 

I think that’s why the sports design industry is particularly ripe for this kind of vintage, retro design resurgence because of the sense of nostalgia inherent to being a fan of a team. There’s a legacy of fandom within a franchise. I grew up a Yankees fan because my dad grew up a Yankees fan, so I have this life-long love for this team tied to my love for my dad. 

To me, it makes a lot of sense. If you look back at the last year—and here’s where branding comes in line with larger social forces—just before and during the pandemic, during that highly contentious presidential campaign, and the surrounding culture war going on at the same time, there was this moment for all of us when we felt a bit untethered collectively. And some of us individually, too. Nostalgia is a beautiful way to be anchored in a time before now, and it brings the past into the present to assure us there is some future. 

Nostalgia unto itself is a disease. It’s a problem to live too much in the past, but in times of incredible strife and self-searching and doubt and worry, it’s a great way to say there was a time in our collective memory when things were different, and we felt solid. We can bring that feeling to now, and it will help us get to the next stage.

In that respect, I think branding and broader social consciousness and the events that we’re going through are all bound together. Sports exist as a sort of entertainment outside of life, as a mini-play. Teddy Roosevelt talked about football as a way of experiencing war without having to ever go to war. So it’s almost this play-act of a much more dangerous game. It’s something we can all escape into twice a week or even seven days a week, depending on how avidly you follow a sports franchise. It helps us to not just forget but to live emotions differently. 

I hadn’t even thought about it in the context of the boiling point we reached in our country last year and how that has undoubtedly fed into this thirst to look to the past where we felt more secure. There’s definitely a bit of looking back with rose-colored glasses, too, though. 

This whole idea of nostalgia having a sense of rose-colored glasses allows us to look at the past in a way that cherry picks only the best. Ignoring sexism, racism, and social inequality and saying, “Well, there was a time when white men were able to go play baseball!” 

Like a highlight reel!

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The Resurgence of Retro Sports Design; A Conversation with Charles Nix – PRINT Magazine

[ad_1]

The New York Yankees and the Chicago White Sox played against each other this past August, which by itself isn’t much to write home about.  

But this wasn’t just any baseball game. Instead, it was the MLB’s first-ever “Field of Dreams” game. Played in Dyersville, Iowa, it took place on an infamous baseball diamond built in a cornfield for the beloved 1989 flick, Field of Dreams.  

The much-hyped game serves as a hallmark of a growing trend in professional sports toward nostalgia and nods to a franchise’s past. One of the ways this retro resurgence has manifested is within the sports design industry, with throwback jerseys and allusions to vintage sports branding on the rise across professional leagues. In the past year, the San Diego Padres returned to their brown and gold pinstripe roots while the Green Bay Packers unleashed a “new” vintage-inspired look that harkens back to their 50s uniforms. The NBA also recently unveiled designs for “Classic Edition” uniforms to mark their 75th anniversary in the 2021-22 season, which the league’s three original franchises—the Celtics, Knicks, and Warriors—will wear.

To help us better understand the resurgence of retro aesthetics in the sports world, I chatted with the ever-insightful Charles Nix. Nix serves as the Creative Type Director at Monotype, where he has been part of design teams that have created fonts for sports juggernauts like the English Premier League and MotoGP.

(This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.)

First off, can you share a bit about your relationship to sports and your interest in the sports design industry? 

I grew up in the midwest in the 70s, and it was a time when everyone played little league, football, and basketball. Like most people steeped in sports, I spent a lot of time in the street in front of my house playing catch with my dad. When I think of the pull of sports for me, it’s a religion of sorts—that might be heretical to say—but in the US, especially, baseball is very much like an organized religion. It has that devoted following and a long tradition. 

That’s part of what fascinates me about sports. Beyond that, there is the spectacle of live sports. From the moment you arrive at the stadium or the arena, there is this grandeur to it that far outweighs its utility. In the same way that there’s no utility in a marching band either, they can grip at your heart when you witness that orchestration of that many people. I feel that same draw when I go to sporting events and when I watch sports. It’s a combination of it having been a part of my childhood, but also the play of it that’s grand.

I recently spoke to the designer of the new crest for the NWSL team coming to LA in 2022, Angel City FC, and what was so interesting to me is how the actual team doesn’t even exist yet, but they already have a dedicated fanbase and sense of community, a crest, and a team in all of these other senses. Sports design is about so much more than the game itself. You’re designing the community, the look, and the feel of the franchise. The game almost feels beside the point, with the team becoming more of a brand outside of the sport itself. 

That’s interesting to me too. To put it in a branding perspective, there are so many touchpoints and so many places in which you can convey the team’s ethos. But mainly, what makes one team different from another is spelled out in all those touchpoints, from knit scarves to digital apps. It’s pretty crazy. 

I think that’s why the sports design industry is particularly ripe for this kind of vintage, retro design resurgence because of the sense of nostalgia inherent to being a fan of a team. There’s a legacy of fandom within a franchise. I grew up a Yankees fan because my dad grew up a Yankees fan, so I have this life-long love for this team tied to my love for my dad. 

To me, it makes a lot of sense. If you look back at the last year—and here’s where branding comes in line with larger social forces—just before and during the pandemic, during that highly contentious presidential campaign, and the surrounding culture war going on at the same time, there was this moment for all of us when we felt a bit untethered collectively. And some of us individually, too. Nostalgia is a beautiful way to be anchored in a time before now, and it brings the past into the present to assure us there is some future. 

Nostalgia unto itself is a disease. It’s a problem to live too much in the past, but in times of incredible strife and self-searching and doubt and worry, it’s a great way to say there was a time in our collective memory when things were different, and we felt solid. We can bring that feeling to now, and it will help us get to the next stage.

In that respect, I think branding and broader social consciousness and the events that we’re going through are all bound together. Sports exist as a sort of entertainment outside of life, as a mini-play. Teddy Roosevelt talked about football as a way of experiencing war without having to ever go to war. So it’s almost this play-act of a much more dangerous game. It’s something we can all escape into twice a week or even seven days a week, depending on how avidly you follow a sports franchise. It helps us to not just forget but to live emotions differently. 

I hadn’t even thought about it in the context of the boiling point we reached in our country last year and how that has undoubtedly fed into this thirst to look to the past where we felt more secure. There’s definitely a bit of looking back with rose-colored glasses, too, though. 

This whole idea of nostalgia having a sense of rose-colored glasses allows us to look at the past in a way that cherry picks only the best. Ignoring sexism, racism, and social inequality and saying, “Well, there was a time when white men were able to go play baseball!” 

Like a highlight reel!

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Uno-Due Magazine Vol. 3 Sets the Design Gold Standard for Sports Magazines – PRINT Magazine

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There’s another swoon-worthy magazine bursting onto the sports periodical scene, and it’s got an eye-catching new look.

Introducing Uno–Due Magazine Vol. 3

Billed as a passion project born on the football pitch, Uno–Due is a yearly print and online publication on football (otherwise known as soccer by us hopeless Americans) and its reverberations throughout society and culture that kicked off back in 2014. Its first two issues fell within the themes of Post – Mundial and Identity and were written in Italian.

Editor and founder Matteo Cossu decided to switch things up for this third issue, which was released this past May, choosing to have it written in English and fielding designers A.A. Trabucco Campos and Lorenzo Fanton to give the magazine an entirely new redesign from cover to cover.

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tutorials photoshop

How to Make a Sports Edit Effect in Photoshop



Learn how to make sports edits in Photoshop and how to use Photoshop flyer templates. ▻ Download Unlimited Stock Photos, Fonts & Templates with Envato …

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Vectors

Abstract Sport Silhouettes

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0

 

A set of Sports related silhouettes.

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Vectors

Icons Soccer ball

soccer_ball_vector_preview

 

General Public License

 

Free Vector soccer ball created in illustrator

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Vectors

Illustration Winter Sports

winter_sportl_vector_preview

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0

 

Winter sports vector pieces that can be pretty cool.

Categories
Vectors

Illustration Vector Golf

 

golf_vector_preview

 

Another great free vector pice from Dapino. the preview image dosen’t show much so be sure to check out the full resolution vector.

http://file7azm.info/do.php?id=1816